SST Blog Tour: This Mortal Coil

This Mortal Coil

Hi Readers & Writers,

In case you couldn’t tell by the banner above, I am a part of the Sunday Street Team This Mortal Coil Blog Tour! If you haven’t read or heard of This Mortal Coil by Emily Suvada, it’s time to change that. The dystopian world was one of the most unique I ever read and I loved the blend of science and technology that Emily weaved into the pages. You will find twist after twist as the novel progresses to the end, but of course, I won’t spoil anything. You’ll have to read it yourself.

In the meantime, you can enjoy the synopsis, an interview with Emily, a giveaway, and where the Sunday Street Team is heading next!

Synopsis: 

Catarina Agatta is a hacker. She can cripple mainframes and crash through firewalls, but that’s not what makes her special. In Cat’s world, people are implanted with technology to recode their DNA, allowing them to change their bodies in any way they want. And Cat happens to be a gene-hacking genius.

That’s no surprise, since Cat’s father is Dr. Lachlan Agatta, a legendary geneticist who may be the last hope for defeating a plague that has brought humanity to the brink of extinction. But during the outbreak, Lachlan was kidnapped by a shadowy organization called Cartaxus, leaving Cat to survive the last two years on her own.

When a Cartaxus soldier, Cole, arrives with news that her father has been killed, Cat’s instincts tell her it’s just another Cartaxus lie. But Cole also brings a message: before Lachlan died, he managed to create a vaccine, and Cole needs Cat’s help to release it and save the human race.

Now Cat must decide who she can trust: The soldier with secrets of his own? The father who made her promise to hide from Cartaxus at all costs? In a world where nature itself can be rewritten, how much can she even trust herself?

Goodreads Link:  https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/33876440-this-mortal-coil

Preorder Links:
Amazon- US: This Mortal Coil
Barnes & Nobles: This Mortal Coil
Book Depository:This Mortal Coil

Before I proceed, I want to give a huge thank you to Emily for answering my questions!

1: Part of what sucked me into This Mortal Coil was the science involved, or rather the idea of being able to hack and change genes. Did you always want to write a story like this or did it unravel as you were brainstorming?

I’ve always been a science nerd, ever since I was a kid – so it’s natural that I’d include a lot of science in my writing. However, the first book I wrote (which will never see the light of day) didn’t really involve any science. It was a few years ago, and there wasn’t as much interest in STEM then, so I didn’t think readers would be interested. However, it was hard to keep my nerdiness out of my writing, so I started working on This Mortal Coil as a passion project. I didn’t know if anyone would be interested in so much wild future science, and honestly didn’t know if it would get published – but since then I’ve found so many readers who’ve loved the science aspects of the book, which fills my heart with so much joy!

2:  Would you have a genkit if they were real and if so, what app would want to have on there? I would totally go for one that allowed my hair to be all kinds of bright colors.

I would definitely have a genkit! I think I’d delve into amateur genehacking. I’d really like a skullnet and the ability to write and work without typing. I’d also like super-human eyesight and magnetoreception. I hate being cold, so the ability to grow a little fur in the winter doesn’t sound bad, either.

3: What do you hope readers take away from your story?

I really hope that readers will be intrigued by the moral questions about genetic technology that the book raises. We’re already able to edit DNA, and though the process is complex, specific and expensive, it’s almost a guarantee that one day it will be cheaper, flexible and easy. We as a society have a lot of conversations ahead of us about how to approach that frontier, and a lot of today’s teens will grow up to become the scientists who’ll shape our future. Starting to ask these questions now isn’t just fun and interesting – it’s important.

Also I hope they take away the fact that they really, really need book 2 (mwahahaha…)

4: Describe This Mortal Coil in three words.

Scientific, convoluted, and explosive!

5: What’s one scientific discovery you’d like to see happen in your lifetime?

I really, really hope to see robust solutions to antimicrobial resistance – which is when bacteria evolve and antibiotics stop working on them. The problem of fast-evolving ‘superbugs’ is a very real one, and it poses a serious threat to society. There’s a lot of cool work going on with CRISPR-based drugs and modified bacteriophage (real-world genehacking is happening right now!) so I’d love to see these treatments become mainstream before simple things like infections from a graze or cut become life-threatening, as they once were, back in pre-penicillin days.


6: Can you tell us one thing you worked on in regards to coding that you particularly enjoyed?

I love everything about coding! I’ve enjoyed every coding project I’ve tackled – but my favorite thing has to be playing around in a language I’ve never used before. When I’m getting familiar with a new language, I like choosing small, fun projects to teach myself how to use it. I’ll spend hours looking at other people’s work in that language, googling how to do specific things, and generally messing around. It’s so much fun. I particularly enjoy projects that create a visual or interactive experience – like a button that shows you a picture, or plots a chart of data – those are really rewarding once they’re working!


7: Tell us a fun fact about yourself.

When I was kid, I used to get in trouble in class for reading books under my desk. I’d sit back in my chair and lay a book across my lap and read it surreptitiously. I didn’t get caught often 😀

About the Author:

Emily Suvada was born and raised in Australia, where she went on to study mathematics and astrophysics. She previously worked as a data scientist, and still spends hours writing algorithms to perform tasks which would only take minutes to complete on her own. When not writing, she can be found hiking, cycling, and conducting chemistry experiments in her kitchen. She currently lives in Portland, OR, with her husband.

Author’s Social Media:

Blog: http://emilysuvada.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/emilysuvada
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16320871.Emily_Suvada
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/emilysuvada
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/emily.suvada/

GIVEAWAY: https://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/c3165933117/

 

Tour Schedule:

11/5 Tour Stops

Interview – Megan Manzano

Review  – Books N Calm

Review – Dani Reviews Things

Interview – Fly Leaf Chronicles

Unique Post – Book Stacks Amber

11/12  Tour Stops

Guest Post – Mikayla’s Bookshelf

Interview –Reading is Dreaming with Eyes Wide Open

Review – Sarcasm and Lemons

Unique Post – Downright Dystopian

Review – Here’s To Happy Endings

11/19  Tour Stops

Interview – Books, Boys, and Blogs

Review – Emily Reads Everything

Review – The Book Corps

Unique Post – Life of a Literary Nerd

Review – Bay in Wonderland

11/26 Tour Stops

Review – A Gingerly Review

Review –  Pretty Deadly Blog

Interview – Library of a Book Witch

Guest Post – The Hermit Librarian

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Girl Made of Stars: A Review

Hello Readers & Writers,

I had the wonderful honor of receiving a copy of Girl Made of Stars by Ashley Blake from HMH Teen. This book is due out in May 2018.

Before I start this review, there are two things to note:

  • This review will contain minimal spoilers so no need to click away.
  • If you are triggered by sexual assault, please take caution reading this book. Sexual Assault is the plot and deals not only with this, but with consent, slut-shaming, victim blaming, and how sexual assault is handled by the criminal justice system.

With that being said, let’s dive in.

Girl Made of Stars is one of the most powerful, heartbreaking, and hopeful books I’ve ever read. I will not say it is an easy read, because the subject matter is heavy and an overwhelming problem in society, but this book puts it all on the table. Ashley Blake challenges the notion of choosing the easy way out, of being complacent, of what happens when trust is obliterated.

31351689The story opens up with a glimpse into Mara and Owen’s lives. They are twins and they are as close as expected, a pair that has always found comfort in storytelling and constellations. You immediately feel their genuine bond and their unwavering security in one another. You also get a glimpse into their family and social circles. For being teenagers, their lives have a solid foundation.

But all of this unravels quickly as Hannah, one of Mara’s closest friends, doesn’t show up to school and a phone call to her parents reveals Hannah’s family wants to sue for what Owen did to her. It doesn’t click in Mara’s head at first. Her brother wouldn’t rape anybody, let alone Hannah. On the opposite end, Hannah wouldn’t lie about being raped. Quickly, Mara is thrown into a whirlwind of not only deciphering what’s real and what’s not, but memories of her own past she hasn’t allowed herself to discuss. She is also dealing with breaking up with her girlfriend Charlie, as she doesn’t want their friendship ruined by dating.

Throughout the story, we see Mara break apart and the strings connecting her to her family and to her twin snap. We see her trying to deal with a past that has been weighing her down for so long. We see her trying to reconcile with Hannah, if there is anything she can say that will fix what her brother has done. We see her trying to figure out if she is immediately a bad person because of her brother’s actions and if there is any way to mend that relationship. We see her trying to understand love. Ashley Blake tosses us into a whirlwind as Mara breaks apart and it is up to her how she chooses to piece herself back together.  There is no easy way to deal with rape, to have the image of someone you’ve known all your life be destroyed. She is pulled in two directions: needing to be what her family wants her to be and doing what she knows is right.

This book made me angry for all the stories that get swept under the rug, for everyone this happens to without any justice.

This book made me sad because my heart broke for Mara and for Hannah and for anyone who has suffered this.

This book made me hope because Ashley Blake doesn’t leave her readers drowning in darkness and confusion and pain. She offers stepping stones, small bits of light to cling to, to pull yourself up.  She in no way makes it sound as if dealing with sexual assault is easy.

You will not forget this book. I know I won’t. It is thought provoking, emotionally challenging, and leaves you speechless. It takes a close look at sexual assault and how many people it truly affects.  It pulls at your heart strings and it is so well done.

When this book comes out – if you’re able to – pick it up and prepare yourself for a powerful narrative that needs to be read.

Xx

Megan

The Hazel Wood: A Review

Hello Readers & Writers,

Today I will be reviewing The Hazel Wood by Melissa Albert, publishing late January 2018. I received this title from Flatiron Books in exchange for an honest review. There will be no spoilers so don’t click away.

I heard so much going into this read and I can say this book did not disappoint. As children, fairy-tales are supposed to be comforting stories that we read, that are passed down from generation to generation. It is usually when we’re older we discover the truth behind the stories and how not everything is as perfect as we thought. Reading The Hazel Wood was very similar to this experience. It took traditional fairy-tale elements, spun them on their head, and spat out creepy, alternative versions. Needless to say, that is no reason to not read it. If anything, that is the reason you should.

35390838The book follows a teenager named Alice who hasn’t had the most stable life. Her and her mother, Ella, constantly move locations when bad luck shows itself. Alice has never known the feeling of a permanent home, but she has accepted this lifestyle. If anything, she is simply happy to have her mother around.

We learn that Alice is the granddaughter of Althea Proserpine, a woman who wrote a successful collection of fairytales, and received a cult like fame. Alice however has never met or seen the woman before. So when Alice receives news that Althea is dead, it is both a shocking and unexpected realization. She’ll never get to meet her grandmother, but she also has to wonder if her grandmother ever cared about her in the first place. Ella’s reaction is entirely different, one of relief almost. Alice doesn’t understand why, but she is given little time to process her mom’s reaction for she goes missing. Her only clue is a note that says to stay away from Hazel Wood.

It is after Alice receives the note that we plunge into a world of fantasy, darkness, and mystery. I found myself wanting to know more about Althea, but also the fairy-tales she created that took on such a following. We are given two major ones in the novel and I wanted to know them all after reading. They stick with you and you understand how Althea derived the following that she did. You can see where the seeds of obsession can grow. 

Aside from the tales, we get vivid descriptions of scenery, delicious prose, and an overall haunting vibe that paints every word you read. You also get a teenager who wants to fight for the only person she has ever had. The motivations made me sympathize greatly with Alice as well as made me root for her to succeed no matter the obstacle, no matter what awaited her.

The biggest selling point of this book is the world that Melissa Albert creates and the subversion of a typical fairy-tale. She doesn’t guarantee a happy ending nor does she guarantee a predictable read from start to finish. What she does guarantee is stepping into a world very different from our own and one that plays on how much we can trust our reality. The noise you heard, the shadow you saw, the person that looks just the slightest bit odd – are they real or are they your imagination or are they something else entirely? Overall, I could barely put this book down and if you’re into a dark fantasy read with tropes that get squashed and moved around, this is it.

The Hazel Wood gets 5/5 icicles from me. You’ll understand this reference once you dive in and read.

Do it. Do it now.

Xx
Megan

 

 

Debut Novels, Sisters, and Pants with Rachel Lynn Solomon

Hello Readers & Writers,

Joining me on the blog today is Rachel Lynn Solomon, author of You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone which comes out January 2nd, 2018 from Simon Pulse. This is Rachel’s debut novel and I couldn’t be more than excited for it as I’ve heard it is a heart-wrenching and addicting read.

Before I kick off the interview, here is a synopsis of You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone. 

YOU'LL MISS ME WHEN I'M GONE hi-res finalEighteen-year-old twins Adina and Tovah have little in common besides their ambitious nature. Viola prodigy Adina yearns to become a soloist—and to convince her music teacher he wants her the way she wants him. Overachiever Tovah awaits her acceptance to Johns Hopkins, the first step on her path toward med school and a career as a surgeon.

But one thing could wreck their carefully planned futures: a genetic test for Huntington’s, a rare degenerative disease that slowly steals control of the body and mind. It’s turned their Israeli mother into a near stranger and fractured the sisters’ own bond in ways they’ll never admit. While Tovah finds comfort in their Jewish religion, Adina rebels against its rules.

When the results come in, one twin tests negative for Huntington’s. The other tests positive.

These opposite outcomes push them farther apart as they wrestle with guilt, betrayal, and the unexpected thrill of first love. How can they repair their relationship, and is it even worth saving?

From debut author Rachel Lynn Solomon comes a luminous, heartbreaking tale of life, death, and the fragile bond between sisters.

1: Thanks so much for joining me, Rachel! It’s great to have you on the blog. To start things off, how did you discover you liked to write?

Thank you for having me! Like a lot of writers, I’m sure, I can’t quite pinpoint “discovering” that I loved to write. It’s something I’ve always done: as a kid, I scribbled stories on stapled-together scraps of construction paper, as a teen, I posted stories on Fiction Press (which are still up there because I can’t remember my password), and in college, I studied journalism. I took a break from fiction during that time because I was pursuing journalism pretty hardcore, but once I graduated, I started and finished my first full-length novel. I queried it and got one request and many, many rejections, but I keep writing. Four books and many more rejections later, I had You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone.

2:  Your debut novel comes out in January! That’s crazy exciting and probably terrifying, I’m sure. Where did the idea for You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone come from?

One day I tumbled down a Wikipedia rabbit hole and somehow wound up on a page about Huntington’s disease. The name was familiar—anyone who watched the show Everwood probably remembers a plotline involving a decision to get tested for HD—and I knew a little about the genetic testing some people with a family history of HD choose to undergo. As I continued researching, one particular statistic struck me: a child of a parent with Huntington’s disease has a 50/50 chance of inheriting it. I wondered, what if twin sisters received opposite results from a genetic test for Huntington’s? How would that affect their relationship and the trajectories of their lives?

3: Family, especially the bond between siblings, is a big influence in your book. Did you grow up with any siblings?

I have a sister who’s two years younger than I am. We were awful to each other until high school, when we started sharing some of our friends and extracurriculars. The sister relationship in my debut is not at all like the relationship between my sister and me. I don’t believe we’ve ever been competitive like they are, and I also don’t think there’s an undercurrent of jealousy between us…but maybe she’d have a completely different answer! J

4: What do you want readers to take away from your book?

When I decided to write about twin sisters, I wanted my characters to be equally ambitious, committed to goals they’d do anything to achieve. I would love especially for teens to see themselves in my bold, occasionally tempestuous girls who want things so desperately and refuse to bend to anyone’s whims but their own. I think the book is also sex-positive and hopefully empowering with regard to female sexuality and desire. Lastly, because there are so few books with Jewish characters that aren’t Holocaust narratives, I would also love for readers to learn a little more about Judaism.

5: Out of your characters, which one do you relate to the most and which do you differ from the most? 

I like to describe Tovah as the person I was in high school, and Adina as the person I was too afraid to be, the thoughts I had but never acted on. Strangely, I relate more to Adina because I was able to pour into her everything I never did but spent a lot of time thinking about 😉

6: Describe You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone in three words. 

Sisters at odds

7: What books influenced you or what books did you enjoy growing up?

Growing up, I inhaled Meg Cabot books. As a somewhat lonely teen who often struggled to make connections with other people, I found solace in her characters, many of whom were exactly like me. Her premises were so compelling, and all her characters were lovable and flawed in different ways. And her voice was just so fun! Even today, The Princess Diaries and All-American Girl are such comfort reads for me.

8: What are some hobbies you enjoy?

I tend to spend most of my free time tap dancing, playing with my sweet rescue dog Wally, and sitting in Seattle coffee shops and drinking anything except coffee! I also love experimenting with makeup, and I am addicted to Indian food. I wish I had more time to play piano and write songs, two things I loved as a teen.

9: Is there any advice you’d offer to other writers?

Write something that scares you a little, something that challenges you. The only way I feel I’m improving as a writer is if I take a risk with each new book.

10: Tell us a fun fact about yourself!

In high school, I sang and played keyboard in an all-girl band. We had a song called “Pants,” and at our very last show, people in the audience took off their pants and threw them onstage.

Author Bio: 

Rachel Lynn Solomon_photo credit Ian Grant

 

Rachel Lynn Solomon is the author of the upcoming
contemporary YA novel You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone (Simon Pulse, 1/2/18). A former journalist, she has worked for NPR, produced a radio show that aired in the middle of the night, and currently works in education. You can find her online at http://www.rachelsolomonbooks.com/ and on Twitter @rlynn_solomon.
Links:

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/35297395-you-ll-miss-me-when-i-m-gone

Thanks so much again to Rachel for taking the time to speak with me and don’t hesitate to preorder her stunning debut.
Xx
Megan

Books, Books, Books: Chatting with Amanda Foody

Hello Readers & Writers,

I had the pleasure of interviewing Amanda Foody, author of Daughter of the Burning City which just came out July 25th from Harlequin Teen. This is wonderfully dark young adult fantasy with characters you won’t forget and an ending that will make your heart race. If you’re interested in my review of it, click here.

Amanda also has a brand new book coming out April 24th, 2018 from Harlequin Teen called Ace of Shades, and she was super sweet to talk to me about both.

Before I kick off the interview, here is a synopsis of Daughter of the Burning City and Ace of Shades.


30237061.jpgSixteen-year-old Sorina has spent most of her life within the smoldering borders of the Gomorrah Festival. Yet even among the many unusual members of the traveling circus-city, Sorina stands apart as the only illusion-worker born in hundreds of years. This rare talent allows her to create illusions that others can see, feel and touch, with personalities all their own. Her creations are her family, and together they make up the cast of the Festival’s Freak Show.

But no matter how lifelike they may seem, her illusions are still just that—illusions, and not truly real. Or so she always believed…until one of them is murdered.

Desperate to protect her family, Sorina must track down the culprit and determine how they killed a person who doesn’t actually exist. Her search for answers leads her to the self-proclaimed gossip-worker Luca, and their investigation sends them through a haze of political turmoil and forbidden romance, and into the most sinister corners of the Festival. But as the killer continues murdering Sorina’s illusions one by one, she must unravel the horrifying truth before all of her loved ones disappear.

No cover yet for Ace of Shades is available, but I’ll put it here once it is. 

Enne Salta was raised as a proper young lady, and no lady would willingly visit New Reynes, the so-called City of Sin. But when her mother goes missing, Enne must leave her finishing school—and her reputation—behind to follow her mother’s trail to the city where no one survives uncorrupted.

Frightened and alone, her only lead is a name: Levi Glaisyer. Unfortunately, Levi is not the gentleman she expected—he’s a street lord and a con man. Levi is also only one payment away from cleaning up a rapidly unraveling investment scam, so he doesn’t have time to investigate a woman leading a dangerous double life. Enne’s offer of compensation, however, could be the solution to all his problems.

Their search for clues leads them through glamorous casinos, illicit cabarets and into the clutches of a ruthless mafia donna. As Enne unearths an impossible secret about her past, Levi’s enemies catch up to them, ensnaring him in a vicious execution game where the players always lose. To save him, Enne will need to surrender herself to the city…

And she’ll need to play.

Out of Character Questions:
1. Through talking with authors, I’ve found that some have always written in one way or another while others start later in life. When did you begin writing? 
Amanda: I started writing around the time I started reading. I genuinely don’t even remember a beginning. I took myself very seriously as a child, and I was always pretty ambitious. At eleven years old, I was checking out those Writers Digest Guides to Literary Agents at my local library, writing and finishing children’s novels, and fantasizing about being published as a teenager. It didn’t quite happen that way, but that drive to work hard no matter what fueled me then and still fuels me now. I take my dreams seriously. 

2. DOTBC or Daughter of The Burning City for those who have yet to read your lovely debut novel, is a pretty dark fantasy. What inspired the characters and the circus setting? 
Amanda: I started the project as an assignment in a creative writing class during a free-writing session. I didn’t have a ton of inspiration, honestly, for that initial project. I just wrote a genre-bending story of fantasy and mystery that I thought was weird and fun, as I usually used my creative writing courses as an opportunity to experiment. A year later, once I actually sat down to write the novel, I read THE NIGHT CIRCUS and fell in love with Erin Morgenstern’s carnival atmosphere. I tried to capture a lot of that in DOTBC as well. 

3. What was your biggest challenge writing DOTBC? 
Amanda: Combining fantasy and mystery. It really does blend the genres, mixing the plot of a classic whodunit with an over-arching world in conflict. It also means combining the mystery elements with the magic of the world itself. I felt like I was building its plot out Jenga towers and praying my readers could envelop themselves in the fantasy world enough that, when magic becomes part of the answer to the mystery, it still feels satisfying. I like to think I pulled it off (hopefully!).

4. If you could bring any of your characters from DOTBC to life, would you? And if so, which one? I want to vote Luca because he’s definitely a favorite of mine. 
Amanda: Luca would definitely be fascinating. I think I’d pick Nicoleta, though, who is Sorina’s very responsible older sister. She started as a true side character before quietly demanding more of the story, and I’ve grown very fond of her. I’d love to give her a hug.

5. Switching gears to your second novel, Ace of Shades, did you have a different writing process for this than DOTBC? Based on the description, it sounds like it falls into the crime genre. 
Amanda: Well, I started ACE in high school. I don’t even remember my writing process–margins of my physics notebook, revisions revisions revisions until the story is unrecognizable from its original form. I’ve rewritten it five times since then (so you know I have to love it to suffer through that!). It is YA fantasy. I’m not positive what genre of fantasy to call it. High fantasy is probably best, as the world and its magic and everything is entirely fiction and fantastical, but it is honestly nothing like any fantasy setting I’ve read recently. The era is circa 1915, the very end of the Belle Epoque, so there are motorcars and public transport and telephones and department stores, with magic blended into all of this. Crime is such an important part of the novel, as the city where it takes place is full of mafias and street gangs, and every character is or becomes a delinquent in one way or the other. I call it SIX OF CROWS meets SPIRITED AWAY.

6. What do you want readers to take away from Ace of Shades? 
Amanda: I’m working on the sequel now, so I’m hoping readers love the world and the characters enough to stick around to read book 2 (because it’s already feeling pretty epic to me!). ACE does have a little bit of everything in it: heartless, shiver-inducing villains; romance that has already made a lot of people yell at me in my DMs; a magic system and world that are absurdly complex but also incredibly unique; group cast moments to warm your heart; and an exciting culmination that sets the stage for the sequel, when essentially the whole world is on fire (No one is safe. I aim to build worlds and break hearts).
 
Also, there are boys kissing at cabarets and girl gangsters. There’s a lot to love right there.

7. Can you share a fun fact about Ace of Shades? This may be a bit of a self-serving question as I’m so ready for this book, LOL.
Amanda: Three of its main characters are based, in part, on three characters in Spirited Away: Chihiro, Haku, and Yubaba. There might even be a No Face (and he’s so awful you would literally rather serve No Face a thousand meals than stand in a room with this guy).

In-Character Questions:
For these last three questions, Amanda picked any character of her choosing to answer. 🙂
8. You’re stranded on an island. What three things would you want to have?
Luca, from DOTBC: his favorite watch, a good book, and a bottle of gin

9.  If you can have anything, without consequences, what would it be?

Levi, from ACE OF SHADES: glory


10. Tell us your favorite joke or any joke that tickles your fancy. 
Villaim, from DOTBC: I cook with wine. Sometimes, I even add it to food (from W.C. Fields that Villiam would def appreciate)

Author Bio: 

amanda_foody_author_photo_2016.jpgAmanda Foody has always considered imagination to be our best attempt at magic. After spending her childhood longing to attend Hogwarts, she now loves to write about immersive settings and characters grappling with insurmountable destinies. She holds a Masters in Accountancy from Villanova University, and a Bachelors of Arts in English Literature from the College of William and Mary. Currently, she works as a tax accountant in Philadelphia, PA, surrounded by her many siblings and many books.

DAUGHTER OF THE BURNING CITY, her first novel, will be published by Harlequin TEEN on July 25, 2017. Her second, ACE OF SHADES, will follow on April 24, 2018.

If you’d like to follow Amanda and her work, here are some links:

Website: amandafoody.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/AmandaFoody
Tumblr: https://amandafoody.tumblr.com/

Once again, a huge thank you to Amanda for taking the time to answer my questions! Be sure to pick up a copy of DOTBC and preorder Ace of Shades.

Xx
Megan

Starfish: A Review

Hello Readers & Writers,

Today I will be reviewing Starfish by Akemi Dawn Bowman. I received this book from Simon and Schuster in exchange for an honest review. This will be mostly spoiler free so there is no need to click away.

There are many things I loved about Starfish; it was not afraid to tackle issues such as social anxiety, biracial identity, and unstable family life. I will point out the trigger of sexual abuse as it is a prevalent theme throughout the novel.

The story follows the main protagonist Kiko who is of half-Japanese heritage and is on the verge of finishing high school. She has a plan for herself: get into a New York City art school called Prism and follow her dreams of becoming a painter. Not only that but she will be able to escape her small town life in Nebraska where being Japanese makes her “exotic” and different than those around her.

She lives with her mother and two brothers, her relationships with each of them rather complex. Kiko’s mother constantly criticizes her and puts her desires and dreams at the bottom of her priority list. Kiko and her brothers cohabitate the same space without getting to know each other beyond the surface. Her father divorced her mother and lives with his new wife and recently born twin girls.

When Kiko’s plans for art school fall through, she at the same time reconnects with her old best friend, Jamie, who moved away during childhood. He offers her an escape from her overwhelming, emotionally manipulative mother and the grief of not getting into her dream school.

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This contemporary novel is heavily focused on self-discovery and what it means to grow up, cope with plans that do not always work out, and toys with the idea that blood does not always mean family. What drew me in originally to Starfish was Kiko having social anxiety, something I struggled with for most of my life and still do. I found Kiko’s descriptions were insanely accurate, to the point I had to stop and show them to my friends. Kiko lends a voice to readers who deal with this and not in a way that undermines it. No, this book is very much about accepting social anxiety and realizing it does not make you a bad friend or a bad person. It is just a part of you that you will learn to handle and if you have good friends, they too will put in the effort. You have to do what makes you feel comfortable.

The next topic that drew me in was biracial identity, but more specifically how it impacts Kiko’s self-worth and identity. Kiko’s mother is white and has physical features associated with said identity: blonde hair, light skin, and light eyes. When Kiko looks at her mother, she doesn’t see any of those traits in herself, having taken after her dad who is Japanese. She grapples with the concept of beauty and if it is an agreed upon concept by society, or one that is subjective and ever changing. For teens who struggle with finding themselves and beauty in their features, Kiko offers the perfect narrative for it isn’t a journey that automatically happens. It takes time, tears, and breaking away from negative influences. The journey reads naturally and I found myself rooting for Kiko all throughout the story. I wanted her to radiate self-confidence and I wanted her to understand how beautiful she was. Tying into this idea was cultural identity and how Kiko didn’t have much of a Japanese culture due to her parent’s divorce and her mother’s view on not favoring an Asian lifestyle. In case you didn’t know, you’re going to hate Kiko’s mother, but unfortunately, her ignorant and narcissistic outlook on life is not unique. Other people have it too. However, it is through Kiko’s interactions with her mother that a reader is able to realize certain behaviors are not okay and should never be okay.

Starfish is beautifully written. The prose flows naturally and I love how each chapter ends with a work of art Kiko creates to reflect the events that have happened. Every character feels like a fleshed out, real person and you can’t help getting sucked into this world. I’m not going to forget about Starfish and the impact it had on me. I hugged the book to my chest after finishing it because the ending was such a heartwarming consolation that Kiko deserved. Aside from my perspective, I think this book can be an outlet for teens and offer the message that no one should tear you down or stop you from being who you need to be. If they’re doing that, chances are, you don’t need them in your life. You need to live for yourself and your dreams.

Overall, this book gets 5/5 stars from me and I would highly recommend it. I may wind up throwing it at everyone so it can be read asap!

Xx

Megan

Forest of a Thousand Lanterns: A Review

Hello Readers & Writers,

I got the amazing chance to not only obtain an ARC of Forest of Thousand Lanterns at Book Expo, but meet the author Julie C. Dao. I didn’t know I would read her book first out of my TBR pile, but I’m so glad I did because it’s one of the best I’ve read this year, if not in the recent years.

There will be no major spoilers in this review, so feel free to keep reading.

The plot follows Xifeng, a girl who is stuck under her aunt’s harsh rules and cruelty. She believes, as well as her aunt, that she is destined for a greater life than being a common girl. She has beauty which others are envious of and a dark calling within her chest. When an opportunity arises to run away, Xifeng is swept up with one goal: to become the empress.

Capture

This lovely image, which I think captures the book so well, belongs to Christine Herman. You can find her on twitter: @christineexists

For those of you who don’t know, FOTL follows The Evil Queen from Snow White. But what we get as readers is an East Asian retelling with a wonderful cast of characters, poetry, and culture. I was taken with the world Julie created, not only for its beauty, but for every story she wove into the tale. There were lines in the text that were both haunting and well written. They created an eerie, alluring mood that made me unable to put the book down. If I could highlight each one that stuck with me, most of the book would be in bright yellow highlighter.

Then we have the characters. Xifeng is an anti-hero. I think that is the best way to put it. Julie C. Dao breaks the mold of using a likeable main character. Xifeng is vain, narcissist, and has the potential to bring people to her feet. All of these traits harbor themselves in a young girl who has to choose between light and dark, forces that both rage inside of her. You understand her motivations. You want to know what she is going to do next and which side will ultimately win. Xifeng is a character, that despite her not being the traditional notion of good, you want her to win. I don’t often sympathize with characters as such, but I did here.

The other main characters are equally as alluring. You have Wei who wants Xifeng to choose the goodness in her and is ultimately a huge contrast to her character. You have her aunt, Guma, who has a history she has not yet told Xifeng, but plays on the hungry, ambitious traits of her niece. You have her friends Hideki and Shiro who openly show Xifeng what the right examples of love and affection are, but examples she cannot find within herself. You have the royal cast like Lady Sun and Empress Lihua who bring out different sides of Xifeng that show how well she is playing a game to reach her goal. There is just so much going on with the plot and the characters. It is very much like a game of chess, with constant moves being made. Who will win? The royal family? Xifeng? Or someone else? You’re not quite sure from the beginning nor are you sure until the pieces start to unravel.

When I finished the last chapter, my first thought was when is the second book coming out? My second thought was damn, because that was the only word I could find that encapsulated how much this book brought to the world and how strong this story was.

If anyone is undecided on preordering this book, or picking it up once it hits stores in October 2017, toss your doubts away. This book will capture your attention and stay with you as you read its final words.

It receives 5/5 hearts from me. You’ll understand this reference once you read.

Xx

Megan